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Fernandes Dearlyn,Wu Ying,Shirodkar Prabhaker Vasant,Pradhan Umesh Kumar,Zhang Jing. 2020. Sources and implications of particulate organic matter from a small tropical river—Zuari River, India. Acta Oceanologica Sinica, 39(4):18-32
Sources and implications of particulate organic matter from a small tropical river—Zuari River, India
Sources and implications of particulate organic matter from a small tropical river—Zuari River, India
Received:July 01, 2019  
DOI:10.1007/s13131-020-1544-x
Key words:Zuari River  estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM)  suspended particulate matter (SPM)  organic matter (OM)  amino acids (AA)  degradation index (DI)
中文关键词:  Zuari River  estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM)  suspended particulate matter (SPM)  organic matter (OM)  amino acids (AA)  degradation index (DI)
基金项目:The National Natural Science Foundation of China under contract No. 41530960.
Author NameAffiliationE-mail
Fernandes Dearlyn State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062, China dearlynfernandes@qq.com 
Wu Ying State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062, China  
Shirodkar Prabhaker Vasant National Institute of Oceanography (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dona Paula, Goa 403004, India  
Pradhan Umesh Kumar National Institute of Oceanography (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Regional Centre, 4 Bungalows, Andheri (West) 400053, Mumbai, India  
Zhang Jing State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062, China  
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Abstract:
      Transitional ecosystems, estuaries and the coastal seas, are distinctively affected by natural and anthropogenic factors. Organic matter (OM) originating from terrestrial sources is exported by rivers and forms a key component of the global biogeochemical cycles. Most previous studies focused on the bulk biochemical and anthropogenic aspects affecting these ecosystems. In the present study, we examined the sources and fate of OM entrained within suspended particulate matter (SPM) of the Zuari River and its estuary, west coast of India. Besides using amino acid (AA) enantiomers (L- and D-forms) as biomarkers, other bulk biochemical parameters viz. particulate organic carbon (POC), δ13C, particulate nitrogen (PN), δ15N and chlorophyll a were analyzed. Surprisingly no significant temporal variations were observed in the parameters analyzed; nonetheless, salinity, POC, δ13C, PN, δ15N, glutamic acid, serine, alanine, tyrosine, leucine and D-aspartic acid exhibited significant spatial variability suggesting source differentiation. The POC content displayed weak temporal variability with low values observed during the post-monsoon season attributed to inputs from mixed sources. Estuarine samples were less depleted than the riverine samples suggesting contributions from marine plankton in addition to contributions from river plankton and terrestrial C3 plants detritus. Labile OM was observed during the monsoon and post-monsoon seasons in the estuarine region. More degraded OM was noticed during the pre-monsoon season. Principal component analysis was used to ascertain the sources and factors influencing OM. Principally five factors were extracted explaining 84.52% of the total variance. The first component accounted for 27.10% of the variance suggesting the dominance of tidal influence whereas, the second component accounted for heterotrophic bacteria and their remnants associated with the particulate matter, contributing primarily to the AA pool. Based on this study we ascertained the role of the estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) controlling the sources of POM and its implications to small tropical rivers. Thus, changes in temporal and regional settings are more likely to affect the natural biogeochemical cycles of small tropical rivers.
中文摘要:
      Transitional ecosystems, estuaries and the coastal seas, are distinctively affected by natural and anthropogenic factors. Organic matter (OM) originating from terrestrial sources is exported by rivers and forms a key component of the global biogeochemical cycles. Most previous studies focused on the bulk biochemical and anthropogenic aspects affecting these ecosystems. In the present study, we examined the sources and fate of OM entrained within suspended particulate matter (SPM) of the Zuari River and its estuary, west coast of India. Besides using amino acid (AA) enantiomers (L- and D-forms) as biomarkers, other bulk biochemical parameters viz. particulate organic carbon (POC), δ13C, particulate nitrogen (PN), δ15N and chlorophyll a were analyzed. Surprisingly no significant temporal variations were observed in the parameters analyzed; nonetheless, salinity, POC, δ13C, PN, δ15N, glutamic acid, serine, alanine, tyrosine, leucine and D-aspartic acid exhibited significant spatial variability suggesting source differentiation. The POC content displayed weak temporal variability with low values observed during the post-monsoon season attributed to inputs from mixed sources. Estuarine samples were less depleted than the riverine samples suggesting contributions from marine plankton in addition to contributions from river plankton and terrestrial C3 plants detritus. Labile OM was observed during the monsoon and post-monsoon seasons in the estuarine region. More degraded OM was noticed during the pre-monsoon season. Principal component analysis was used to ascertain the sources and factors influencing OM. Principally five factors were extracted explaining 84.52% of the total variance. The first component accounted for 27.10% of the variance suggesting the dominance of tidal influence whereas, the second component accounted for heterotrophic bacteria and their remnants associated with the particulate matter, contributing primarily to the AA pool. Based on this study we ascertained the role of the estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) controlling the sources of POM and its implications to small tropical rivers. Thus, changes in temporal and regional settings are more likely to affect the natural biogeochemical cycles of small tropical rivers.
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